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Joseph Parish

Joseph Parish
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My name is Joseph Parish. I am also known as "Word Writer", a freelance writer who specializes in a host of subjects from survival and emergency actions to gardening. Over the years, I have found that many people involved in the subject of survival claim an attraction towards the subject they practice. A few of them have really meant it. Fewer still have put their life into it and shown their true feelings about the subject. I attended the American Public University, specializing in Emergency Management and Terrorism. I have written one book on terrorism entitled “The Mind of a Terrorist”, and it is available on Amazon. I was brought up in southern New Jersey and attended school in the Millville area, graduating from the Millville Senor High school in 1966. By the time I graduated, I was hooked upon entering the United States Air Force. I was determined to enter the military and pursue a field of study in the area of electronics. I initially attended a course in Aircraft Radio Repair at Kessler Air Force Base in Mississippi. Later, I was trained as a Ground Radio Repairman. Little did I realize that this course of training would eventually lead him into the Forward Air Control Career field. I remained in the military for 21 years, at which time I visited many foreign countries as well as just about all 50 states in America. In 1987, I decided that it was time to get out of the military and retire from active duty. It was at this time that I made a quantum career leap; combining my, military electronics training with my love of Aircraft, I became employed by TRW Aerospace in Redondo Beach California. The company was involved in developing and manufacturing various space craft units and satellites for the government. I will readily admit that the company was one of the greatest places I had ever worked, and really hated to leave the company, but I decided to depart the area. I have developed many interesting and cherished friendships while learning survival techniques, particularly those that dealt with earthquakes. Unfortunately, the area was not the best place to bring up children in and upon the conclusion of my contract with TRW, I returned to the east coast. Upon my return to the New Jersey area, I began teaching school for several years. I generally taught Junior High subjects, such as science and math. After getting involved in the teaching of young minds, I was informed that a close relative in Florida was ill and required help. Without hesitation, I headed to the sunshine state to assist. While in Florida I was employed as an RF Amplifier Engineer. Eventually the crisis which had brought me to Florida was over, and I was once again heading back up north, only this time to the state of Delaware. Here I worked as a mainframe computer operator for a major chicken producer until I decided that it was time for me to permanently retire. I decided to take a slightly different route. I was attracted to the topic of survival because of my love for the military and my field of work while I was active duty. When 9-11 took place in America, there was a rise in the popularity of survival preparations which led to both government and private citizens being concerned about survival. These people and agencies had the freedom to select the various topics relating to the subject and the followers began to flock to them because of their knowledge and values. By the end of 2007, various internet websites began cropping up relating to survival. One such website was mine. Being a part-time newspaper reporter in New Jersey years ago, I would create my own form of written articles. My first exposure to "survival" came as an Air Force Forward Air Controller (ROMAD) during my 21 years in the military. I have served as a unit Safety NCO, Emergency Preparedness NCO and other related duties. Some of my safety related articles had been published in the Air Force Safety Manual. Over the years I have taken courses ranging from FEMA sponsor classes to “Aircraft aviation” courses in my efforts to become more informed on survival techniques and procedures. I am a firm believer that you must be ready for any sort of emergency and above all you simply cannot rely upon the government to help you during times of crisis. I am a follower of the philosophy that you should continue to learn as much as you possibly can and believe that when you stop learning you are simply dead. I am currently an active volunteer in the Delaware Medical Reserve Corp, participating in the Delaware Bat Monitoring Program and the Terrapin Rescue. I previously was a Red Cross volunteer working with the Emergency Management Section of the organization. My hobby is gardening and I have my own greenhouse. I love experimenting with the propagation of plants. Many of my articles center around the topic of gardening. I look forward to accepting assignments from potential clients. Feel free to contact me at (302) 404-5976.

Creation of the World Indian Style

In this rant, I will be comparing and contrasting the Apache and the Achomawi Indian tribes’ adaptation of the creation of their world. Prior to discussing the two versions, it would be appropriate to appreciate some of the history behind these two tribes. The first to be discussed will be the Apache tribe’s history.

Arguments Leading to the Civil War

This brief document is intended to survey a few of the numerous elements which eventually contributed to the nation’s Civil War, along with an appraisal of the adverse feelings experienced by the southern states. The uncompromising blunt of the torment revolved around the Southern states, as these states underwent the prevailing events taking place during the nation’s growing pains. It is often quantified that it is wars which united a nation, and in America’s formable years this is exactly what had transpired. Granted, not all of the New World’s citizens were prepared to acknowledge the start-up nations independence from Great Brittan, however, in favor of these people, the populace did unit together as one with a healthy measure of protest against the objectionable behavior which the king was bestowing upon the colonies.

Why Native Americans were vulnerable to conquest by European adventurers

There were several traits which made the Native American’s vulnerable to conquest by European adventurers. First, the people themselves were inadequately endowed to deal with the European invaders. Their populations were quickly diminishing as a result of famine, forced labor, epidemics involving contact with European diseases and inter-tribal wars.

The Horrors of Alton Civil War Prison

Positioned near the intersection of William and Broadway can be found the remnants of the Alton's dark fleeting moment of glory. All that remains of Alton's previous Civil War penal complex is a small state marker and a few leftover bricks derived from the cellblocks of Illinois’ first Penitentiary.

Industrial North Versus Agrarian South

Let’s fleetingly debate the beginning of one of America's bloodiest of all wars - Our American Civil War. The war did not just materialize out of thin air, but undeniable events progressively led up to the internal conflict. I believe there were explicit milestones established within the preceding decades, which ultimately interposed the Civil War. Most historians will accredit the Civil War to the decades of division, which climaxed into a series of confrontations founded upon the moral and legal ethics of slavery. Shadowing the years after the Louisiana Purchase, our Congress was tasked to inaugurate guidelines for the expansion of slavery into any new territories on the western side of the country. With the influx of Missouri's application for statehood (pro-slavery) we perceive a new spark of debates opening up. It was not so much the moral disputes posed by the institution of slavery, but I contend it was more of a power struggle. Missouri's entry as a slave state would bestow the slave state faction in congress a larger majority than the north had.

Pam’s French Lilac Shrub

A few months back my wife Pam became the proud owner of a donated French Lilac Shrub. Although there are literally hundreds of diverse varieties of these types of Lilacs, we have no idea which one this actually is, perhaps in the springtime we will have some insight into its variety.

I Turn My Shredded Paper Into Compost

Being a writer, I often have a considerable amount of paper that I need to shred for security reasons. This is in addition to the monthly statements for my credit cards and utility bills. All this normally ends up in the trash bin to be taken to the local dump and tossed into a huge hole. Well, I no longer contribute to filling holes at the dump, but rather use my shredded paper to create compost for my garden. In this short lecture I intend to explain to you how I go about this task. It is easy and simple.

A Natural Garden Fungicide

A while back I was fortunate enough to be able to take a course in Herbal applications. During the class one of the formulas which the instructor provided was for a natural homemade fungicide. Many people would prefer not to use any of the commercial chemical-based fungicides on the market today. This solution to the common garden fungal diseases is simple and above all inexpensive. This easy to make homemade product will work well for your cucurbits you have planted such as cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, and watermelon. These plants are usually prone to a fungal disease known as powdery mildew.

Botany Field Kit

Pam and I like to stop and take a cutting from plants which attract our attention, assuming it is legal and permitted. In order to do this, we needed a kit of some sort which included all the supplies and equipment that we would possibly require. This kit is helpful because we never know when we may find something of interest in our travels. Everyone who is interested in plants and growing them should have such a kit. This field kit is nothing as elaborate as the professional botanist kits, but it is adequate for our use.

Pecan Trees from Nuts

As with any other type of nut tree that one undertakes to grow, pecan’s take a considerable amount of patience and skills, especially in their early years. To grow a tree for the nuts you will require several trees rather than just a single one, otherwise you will end up with a beautiful shade tree void of any nut production. Cross-pollination is required by these trees. The patience requires six to eight years of watching the tree slowly grow before seeing any nut appear on it. These trees also require a considerable amount of space since they grow as tall as 150 feet high, thus they between 35 and 50 feet per tree. Pecan trees are able to be cultivated in U.S. zones 6 through 9, thus with Delaware being in zone 7, we are right in the middle.